New Beginnings

CoachingAs some of you already know, for the past few months I’ve been retraining to be a career/life coach and have started my own business. You can find details about it here.

I don’t foresee blogging about intranets and social media in the immediate future(though I will maintain an interest), but I have been writing about my new industry and how it can help all manner of folks.

So, if you or anyone you may currently know or meet in the future, is looking to change their life for the better, then head on over and say Hi. I’ll be very pleased to talk you through how it all works – for FREE of course.

And thanks to those of you who took the time to read and comment on my intranet musings. I’m sure our paths will cross again sometime.

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Job seeking…..

Six months ago I signed on the dole. Or Job Seekers Allowance as our politically correct Govt call it.

Job Centre Plus logo

Job Centre Plus logo

Little do they know, when you turn up at the Job Centre (JC) waving the little magic form they’ve given you that allows you access to the desks beyond the “reception desk”, the maitre d asks if you’ve come to “sign on”. That toff, Iain Duncan Smith (IDS)  should visit a Job Centre once in a while; unannounced obvs, and see what it’s really like. Not all Job Centre’s (well mine is a Job Centre Plus, whatever that is) smell of fresh paint and have bunting.

Tomorrow is my last signing on day and thereafter I’m on my own. I’m entitled to nothing. Nada. Niet. Nuffink. Not a sausage. Well I can go and get a sausage, but I will get no money toward it. I have to pay for my own sausage.

After six months the £70 per week job seekers allowance is stopped and it then becomes means tested. Seeing as I have in excess of £25 million in the bank, then I don’t suppose I’ll qualify for any further help. But that can’t be right can it?

I’ll have to ask my mate IDS the next time I see him on the golf course.  Just before I let the people who really do need the Govt’s support, the chance to bludgeon him; with his own golf clubs natch.

Note; I don’t have £25 million in the bank. And I don’t belong to a golf club. And I’ve never met IDS, but if i do he’ll be sporting the verbal equivalent of a nine iron.

IDS and JC are interchangable.

2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 4,500 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 8 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

Search

We’ve done some analysis on how people use our internal search engine. Hereby follows a list of the top 20 words used to find stuff within the BBC. This top 20 totals a mere 18% of search requests; the other 82% is presumably even more random (I have one of my team looking at it at the moment – I think they’re going to be gone some time).

As you can see we have some wonderfully named systems in the BBC, which seemingly need to be tracked down pretty regularly by their users.

1. google 2. elvis (not Presley – Elvis is the name of our stills library) 3. journalism portal 4. my details (mis-spelling of myDetails)
5. autorot (access to recorded programmes) 6. siemens 7. expenses 8. webkiosk (scheduling of leave and people)
9. mydetails 10. davina (not McCall – this is an application that allows users to search for available media online). 11. pensions 12. p4a (critical post production paperwork application  – eh?
13. proteus (not a drug – or at least I don’t think so – something to do with music licensing I reckon – the actual website doesn’t enlighten me) 14. pension 15. dv solutions 16. jportal (the brand name for the journalism portal)
17. training 18. fastclear (clearance of copyrighted material) 19. mydeals 20. jobs

Our priorities

to-do-list A few posts ago, I outlined what we had on our “to-do” list following the launch of the BBC’s new Gateway homepage which included;

  1. Creation of templates, used with the content management system to allow publishers to make use of a consistent approach and design and concentrate on the content, not site development. These will be inline with the BBC’s internet.
  2. Fix the reported errors/bugs.
  3. Research how people use the search engine and make improvements accordingly.
  4. Look to see what additional functionality we can introduce using Sharepoint 2007.
We’ve done these, except the Sharepoint functionality, which is being constrained by ongoing commercial discussion with our IT supplier, so now what’s next?
Some of our priorities for the next three/six months – in no particular order;
  • move further toward more effective “self service” for the publishing community. Beef up our on-line support materials and increase the range of “how to” videos online to further help and reduce calls/queries from the publishers.
  • reduce further the number of intranet sites not managed by the enterprise content management system – delete those sites that aren’t being managed.
  • improve the performance of the content management system. It’s running like a dog at times. Beef up the engine and pour more petrol in it. Not literally obviously.
  • increase the number of existing sites that use the recently introduced templated approach which also includes improved measurement tools and the inclusion of the common Global Navigation Bar and standardised footer.
  • widen the scope of the intranet development team to take on corporate internet activities. We’re planning on being fully “open for business” in the new financial year, and we’re currently adopting a similar business model for our development activity externally as we are internally; one content management system, a set of templates providing a wide range of functionality and clear ownership of content by editorial teams. This will reduce overall development and ongoing operational spend.
  • analyse intranet survey results and recommend next set of deliverables to the business.
  • understand and implement forthcoming organisational changes.