Features vs functionality.

Features vs functionality

Features vs functionality.

One of the best tweets I’ve seen recently about web usability is simple and direct.

Like most things the simplest approach is usually the most effective. Tristan gets his message across in less than 140 characters and after reading it, we instantly get what he means. No further words are needed. That’s what Twitter has done really well, as has Tristan.

This rule can, and should be, applied to all websites if they’re to be used as intended; both internally and externally.

I have nothing to add. Do you?

Twitter grows by 40%

twitter logo

So Twitter usage is growing faster than Facebook or Google +, globally according to a new study.

What are we to make of this “revelation”?

My first thoughts are “what will this mean to business social media and collaboration?”

In reality, probably very little in the short term. After all, most companies are still awaiting the arrival of an effective micro-blogging, or other social media tools internally to supplement the more traditional communications methods. Whilst more organisations have an intranet of some description, and most are still in different stages of maturity, very few have really embraced the value offered by social business, according to Nielsen; although these numbers are increasing – albeit slowly.

This doesn’t come as any surprise to me to be honest.

Whilst the intranet industry advancements are swifter than other disciplines, and can be measured in dog years, it seems to me that only the more innovative communication leaders who are willing to consider on-line discussions and accept feedback in an open and collaborative space, will help drive their organisations to be even more successful.

Who would you prefer to work for? A “secretive” company that merely “tells you things”, or a forward thinking organisation that engages with its people on a regular basis?

It’s a no brainer surely?